The 10 Worst Foods You Can Eat

This is going to be very helpful. In the end make some conclusions.

1.Chips

One ounce of regular potato chips has 152 calories and 10 grams of fat (3 grams saturated).If you eat just three ounces a week, in one year you’ll have consumed 23,400 calories and added about seven pounds to your waistline. And that’s from just a couple handfuls – which barely constitutes a satisfying snack for most of us.

Healthier Substitutes for Chips: Rice cakes and popcorn cakes are no longer the tasteless Styrofoam-like disks they once were. Now they’re available in lots of flavors, so you can satisfy a salty craving without hitting the potato chips.

2.Most Pizzas

Pizza is one of the world’s most popular junk foods.This is not surprising, given that it tastes awesome and is incredibly convenient to eat.

The problem is that most commercially prepared pizzas are made with seriously unhealthy ingredients.The dough is made from highly refined wheat flour, and the meats on them are usually processed. Pizza is also extremely high in calories.

Alternatives: Some pizza places use healthier ingredients. Homemade pizzas can also be very healthy, as long as you choose wholesome ingredients.

3. Stick Margarine

If your buttery spread can stand on its own, it’s the fats that are making that happen — specifically, its saturated fats. Saturated fats are more solid than, for example, a monounsaturated fat such as olive oil, and these fats are bad for you because they expand your waistline, raise your bad cholesterol levels (while lowering levels of good cholesterol), raise your risk of heart disease and raise your risk of suffering a stroke.

Stick margarine used to contain trans fats, also known as partially hydrogenated oils, and some brands still do (always read the ingredient label); trans fats are considered one of the worst — if not the worst — fats for you to eat.

4.Microwave Popcorn

Quick, easy, and often very tasty, microwave popcorn’s one of the worst foods to eat for several reasons. First, the microwavable bag is lined with a substance that, when heated, releases perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and The American Cancer Society, PFOA stays in the environment and our bodies for a long time after exposure, and it has been shown to increase risk of certain cancers in lab animals as well as cause developmental irregularities. While the EPA has not officially classified PFOA as a carcinogen, it’s scientific advisory board suggested that PFOA is likely a human carcinogen after reviewing draft risk assessment data in 2005.

Second, the artificial butter flavoring in microwave popcorn may also contain 1 of 2 chemicals known to cause respiratory problems: diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione (PD). While the biggest popcorn manufacturers have banned diacetyl from their products after it was shown to have caused lung diseases in those who regularly inhaled it (factory workers and even a consumer), many replaced the dangerous additive with 2,3-pentanedione, which recently has been shown to cause respiratory toxicity in rats.

5.Doughnuts


White flour, vegetable shortening, white sugar – and it’s deep-fried to boot.One glazed Krispy Kreme doughnut packs 200 calories and 12 grams of fat, including heart-stopping saturated fat, trans fats and cholesterol.

An old-fashioned cake doughnut is even worse: 300 calories, 28 grams of carbohydrates and a whopping 19 grams of fat, including 5 grams of saturated fat and 4 grams of trans fats.

6.Gluten-Free Junk Foods

Gluten-free is all the rage these days.

About a third of people in the US are actively trying to avoid gluten, according to a 2013 survey.

The problem with many gluten-free diets, is that people replace the gluten-containing foods with processed junk foods that happen to be gluten-free.These gluten-free replacement products are often high in sugar, unhealthy oils and refined grains like corn starch or tapioca starch. These refined starches lead to rapid spikes in blood sugar, and are extremely low in essential nutrients.

Alternatives: Choose foods that are naturally gluten-free, like unprocessed plants and animal foods. Gluten-free junk food is still junk food.

7. Anything Deep Fried

Deep-fried foods are the weakness of many; even First Lady Michelle Obama has confessed her love for french fries. One of the problems with eating deep-fat fried foods is that cooking foods at such high temperature may cause them to form toxic chemical compounds — that we then eat. You see, too many french fries won’t only increase your waistline (which they will); your side order is also linked to health problems such as stroke and an increased risk of certain cancers including breast, esophageal, head and neck, lung, pancreatic and prostate. Men, for example, who eat fried foods — doughnuts, fried chicken, fried fish and/or french fries — once or more per week increase their risk for prostate cancer as much as 30 to 37 percent.

High-temperature cooking, and especially deep frying, also causes foods to develop AGEs (short for advanced glycation endproducts), and AGEs have been linked to chronic inflammation and disease-triggering oxidative stress.

8.Fat-Free Ice Cream

Low-fat ice cream may sound like healthier fare, but it can cause just as many pounds gained, maybe even more! This is because sugar – another one of my heart-health villains – often replaces the missing fat in low- and non-fat varieties of ice cream. Fat helps your body feel satiated, and – like a speed bump – helps to slow any insulin surges needed to metabolize sugar in your bloodstream. Your body also needs fat to absorb and utilize fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. My advice – if you’ve got to have ice cream, keep the fat and limit portion size to 1/2 cup.

9. Imitation Cheese in a Can

Some people love this stuff.

But they ignore their protesting hearts: Two tablespoons – about the amount you’d put on two crackers – packs 276 calories and 21 grams of fat, 13 grams of which are saturated.

Healthier Substitutes for Imitation Cheese: 
Go for the real thing. Soft cheeses like Brie have about 100 calories per ounce.Goat cheese is even better: One ounce has 76 calories and 5 grams of protein.

10. Canned Soup


Although quick and convenient, canned soup can contain monosodium glutamate (commonly known as MSG),  a “flavor enhancer” that is notorious for causing reactions such as headaches, nausea, heart palpitations, and more. MSG is an excitotoxin that can enter the brain and cause damage to neurons. Although it is widely associated with Chinese food, MSG is also frequently found in American fast and processed foods – be sure to carefully examine food labels for its elusive presence – MSG can go by many names; my colleague.

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Sources: http://www.everydayhealth.com, http://www.healthline.com, http://www.science.howstuffworks.com, http://www.heartmdinstitute.com

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Top 10 Food Allergy Myths

In modern society allergy is big part of our life, so what are top myth to stop believing in.

1.You’re “allergic” to any food that gives you problems.

This statement is false, since there are several problems that can arise after eating specific foods, the majority of which are unrelated to allergy. True allergies to foods are immunologic reactions involving the class of immunoglobulins (proteins that assist in the body’s immune response) known as immunoglobulin (Ig) E. Other kinds of reactions to foods that are not food allergies include food intolerances (such as lactose or milk intolerance ), food poisoning, and toxic reactions.

The prevalence of food allergy in the population is much lower than the prevalence of adverse reactions to foods. It is estimated that true food allergies occur in 2% to 5% of the population.

2.Food allergies can be mild.

Truth:  Yes, reactions can be mild, but even if someone has experienced mild reactions (such as a rash) in the past, they can still have an anaphylactic response to the next exposure.  Allergies are unpredictable.  Here are some possible reactions to exposure to peanuts:  rash, vomiting, diarrhea, drop in blood pressure, swelling, losing the ability to breath (which will cause death if not treated immediately).

3.Food allergy is the same as “intolerance” or “sensitivity.”

There are similarities, for sure. Allergy, intolerance, and sensitivity are a little bit like siblings. They all belong to the same “family” of bad reactions to food. But there are big differences.

An allergy happens when the immune system, your body’s defense against germs, has a reaction to a particular food. It can be mild, like an itchy feeling or hives. Sometimes you get severe symptoms — called anaphylaxis — like trouble breathing, a swollen tongue, or dizziness.
Food intolerance means your body is missing an enzyme you need to digest some type of food. If you’re lactose intolerant, for instance, you don’t have enough lactase, an enzyme that lets you digest dairy products. If you’re gluten intolerant, you can’t process gluten, which is found in some grains including wheat, barley, and rye.

4.You cannot have an allergic reaction on the first known oral exposure to a food allergen.

Mythbuster

Over one‐third of IgE‐mediated allergic reactions occur to a food with no known prior ingestion.

The why?

It is immunologically required to be exposed to antigen/allergen in order to switch B cells from IgM to IgE production and for affinity maturation of B cell responses. This initial exposure (and sensitisation in allergic individuals) to an allergen may occur through the gut via allergens in breast milk,12 the skin particularly in children with a breakdown in the normal skin barrier such as those infants with eczema,13 or more rarely via the respiratory tract without any apparent ingestion of the food in question.

5.All food allergies in children resolve as they get older.” 

As they grow older, some children may tolerate foods that previously caused allergic reactions. This is more likely to happen in the case of allergies to milk, eggs, and wheat, in which the severity of reactions (or symptoms) may decrease by late childhood.

It is not clear in all cases, however, if the improved symptoms are an indication that the allergy has disappeared. Peanut allergy is the least likely to go away. To determine if a food allergy has gone away after an appropriate strict elimination period (typically greater than a year) an oral challenge should be undertaken by an allergist skilled in conducting these challenges.

6. As long as you don’t introduce a food to a child at too young of an age, and no one in your family has food allergies, your child will not develop one.

Truth:  Nobody knows what causes food allergies.  Also, even if no one in your family has ever had a food allergy, your child could develop one (as in our case).  No one is safe from food allergies.  They can even develop as an adult to a food you’ve eaten your whole life.

7.Most food allergies are caused by additives such as artificial colors and flavorings.

“Absolutely a myth,” McMorris says. It’s true that some reactions to additives are similar to those caused by food allergies. Nitrates, for instance, can cause hives and itching. And red and yellow food coloring have been linked to anaphylaxis.

The actual allergy triggers are the proteins in the food, McMorris says. Food additive intolerance is rare. Less than 1% of adults have it.

8.Only children who have had a history of anaphylaxis need an adrenaline autoinjector.

Mythbuster

It is not necessary for a child to have previously experienced anaphylaxis in order to be assessed as being ‘at risk of anaphylaxis’.

The why?

Whether or not a child with an IgE‐mediated food allergy is at risk of anaphylaxis is a clinical judgment that must be considered for all individuals presenting with an IgE‐mediated food allergy. There is no current test (skin test and OFC or other) that can reliably determine this risk.

The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) guidelines state that an adrenaline autoinjector (AAI) prescription is recommended for individuals with a history of anaphylaxis and may also be recommended if there are other known risk factors for more severe or fatal reactions. This includes children with a history of a generalised allergic reaction and any one of the following: adolescent age group, nut allergy, comorbid conditions (e.g. asthma and arrhythmia) or limited access to emergency medical care.

9.Peanut allergy is the most common food allergy.”

 Peanut allergy is the food allergy most likely to result in anaphylactic reactions (severe, potentially fatal allergic reactions), but only about 0.6% of the population is affected by peanut allergy. The most common food allergies reported by adults are allergies to fruits and vegetables.

Any food you’re allergic to could cause a serious reaction, whether it’s peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish, or shellfish. Those eight foods make up 90% of food allergies in the U.S. All of them have the potential to be life-threatening, McMorris says.

10.Oral desensitisation is a cure for food allergy.

Mythbuster

Although small studies suggest that desensitisation with a daily dose of allergen can be achieved for a majority of children with egg, milk and peanut allergy, the majority of children remain allergic once the daily therapy is ceased with current oral immunotherapy regimes and both minor and serious side effects are common.

The why?

Recent studies have reported successful desensitisation with oral immunotherapy (OIT) to peanut, milk and egg. This therapy is generally based upon daily administration of gradually increases allergen doses allergen with up‐dosing and maintenances phases. These have shown a capacity to induce desensitisation in allergic individuals, albeit with both mild and severe allergic symptoms during therapy in a significant proportion of patients.

However, the proportion of children reported to maintain sustained tolerance once regular daily administration of the allergen is ceased is disappointing low at less than 25% with high rates of side effects.

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Sources: http://www.webmd.com, http://www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com, http://www.itchylittleworld.com, http://www.medicinenet.com

Top 10 Most Common Food Allergies

In the list you will find foods that you buy everyday.

1. Milk

Cow’s milk allergy is the most common food allergy among children, affecting about 2-3% of children, although many children will outgrow their allergy before school age.2,3 However, recent research indicates that children who have milk allergy may be less likely to outgrow their allergy than they were in previous decades

2.Eggs

An egg allergy is the second most common cause of food allergy in children

However, 68% of children who are allergic to eggs will outgrow their allergy by the time they’re 16.

Symptoms include:

  • Digestive distress, such as a stomach ache
  • Skin reactions, such as hives or a rash
  • Respiratory problems
  • Anaphylaxis (which is rare)

Interestingly, it’s possible to be allergic to egg whites, but not the yolks, and vice versa. This is because the proteins in egg whites and egg yolks differ slightly.

Yet most of the proteins that trigger an allergy are found in egg whites, so an egg white allergy is more common

Like other allergies, the treatment for an egg allergy is an egg-free diet (13).

However, you may not have to avoid all egg-related foods, as heating eggs can change the shape of the allergy-causing proteins. This can stop your body from seeing them as harmful, meaning they’re less likely to cause a reaction

3.Fish

Fish allergy can often cause severe reactions, including anaphylaxis. Adults are more likely to have an allergic reaction to fish and shellfish than children, which is probably because adults eat these foods more often.

People who are allergic to one type of fish, such as cod, often react to other types of fish, such as hake, haddock, mackerel, and whiting.

This is because the allergens in these fish are quite similar. Cooking doesn’t destroy fish allergens. In fact, some people with a fish allergy can be allergic to cooked but not raw fish.

4.Wheat

Wheat contains the protein gluten which people who suffer from the coeliac disease are allergic to. In many cases, a person suffering from the coeliac disease can tolerate rice but not other wheat-related grains such as oats, rye or barley. Currently, there is no cure for the coeliac disease and those who suffer from it are typically advised to refrain from eating foods that contain gluten.

If gluten is ingested, a person who is allergic to it can experience various symptoms, ranging from mild to life-threatening. They can include:

  • Inflammation in the abdomen and bowel, which is often painful
  • Diarrhoea, bloating and cramping
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Muscle pains
  • Skin irritations

5.Peanuts

Peanut allergy affects between 1-2% of children and 0.6% of the overall U.S. population.2 Peanut allergic individuals may experience mild to life-threatening reactions, which can be unpredictable.

To prevent an allergic reaction to peanuts, all foods that contain or may contain peanuts should be avoided. Peanuts must be listed on food labels under the ingredient list or in a “contains” statement. Lupin is not a peanut ingredient, but has been reported to cause cross-reactivity reactions for peanut allergic individuals. 

6.Tree Nuts

A tree nut allergy is an allergy to some of the nuts and seeds that come from trees.It’s a very common food allergy that’s thought to affect around 1% of the US population

Some examples of tree nuts include:

  • Brazil nuts
  • Almonds
  • Cashews
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Pistachios
  • Pine nuts
  • Walnuts

People with a tree nut allergy will also be allergic to food products made with these nuts, such as nut butters and oils.

7.Soybean

Soybean allergy is a common childhood allergy. Most people grow out of it by the age of two, but occasionally adults are allergic to soybean. The symptoms of soybean allergy are similar to milk allergy, and they include:

  • rashes
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • stomach cramps

Some people with soybean allergy might also react to milk. Very rarely, soybean can cause anaphylaxis.

Soybean is used as an ingredient in about two-thirds of all manufactured food products, including bakery goods, sweets, drinks, breakfast cereals, ice cream, margarine, pasta, processed meats, and seasoned foods.

8.Sesame Seeds

Sesame seeds are especially potent when it comes to food allergens and are most often a lifelong allergy. An allergy to sesame seeds is also particularly difficult to control as the food label does not always specifically say sesame seeds. Other names indicate the presence of sesame seeds; for example, sim sim, benne or gingelly seeds. Both the people suffering from sesame seed allergies and food handlers need to be aware of each different name that can indicate the presence of sesame seeds.

Sesame seeds are tiny and it doesn’t take many to cause and allergic reaction. Some of the symptoms can be:

  • Skin irritations and rashes
  • Abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea
  • Itchy mouth, throat or eyes
  • Swelling of the face, nose or mouth
  • Shortness of breath
  • Anaphylactic reactions – in severe cases

9.Crustacean Shellfish

Shellfish allergy may affect as many as 2.6% of women and 1.5% of men.2Crustacean shellfish includes shrimp, lobster and crab and are the foods within the shellfish category that cause the most…Read More

allergic reactions, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.7Mollusks, such as scallops, clams and mussels, are often tolerated by those with shellfish allergy, but allergic individuals should discuss the risks with their healthcare provider. As with all food allergies, careful avoidance should be maintained to avoid accidental ingestion of allergenic food. Avoiding seafood restaurants and foods with “seafood” in the name (ex. “seafood chowder”) is an important strategy for avoidance. 

Common foods that may contain crustacean shellfish (not an exhaustive list): 

✓ Shrimp, lobster and crab
✓ Prawns
✓ Crayfish or crawfish
✓ “Fish” or “seafood” broth Asian sauces or sauce mixes
✓ Sushi
✓ Artificial crab sticks (surimi)
✓ Seafood or artificial flavoring

10.Other common food allergies

People can be allergic to almost any food. As a result, there are many allergies that affect a lot of people but aren’t part of the big eight; these include:

  • Cereal allergy – the most common foods in this category are oats, wheat, maize (corn), rice, rye, and barley.
  • Coconut allergy – uncommon, though patients may experience anaphylaxis. Those with other nut allergies are more likely to be allergic to coconut.
  • Fruit and vegetable allergy – allergic reactions to fruits and vegetables are usually mild. Cooking vegetables often destroys the allergens.
  • Pine nut allergy – pine nuts can cause severe allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis. People who are allergic to pine nuts might also react to peanuts and nuts, such as almonds.
  • Meat allergy – people with a meat allergy might react to beef, mutton, pork, or chicken. Cooking destroys some of the allergens in meat, but some people will still react.
  • Quorn allergy – Quorn is a type of protein, which is made from a fungus. There have been some reports of intolerance to Quorn, but this is not surprising because allergens are usually proteins.
  • Rice allergy – people who are allergic to rice can react when they eat it or when they inhale its pollen.
  • Spice allergy – reactions to spices are usually mild, but severe reactions can happen occasionally. Some people react to mustard, coriander, caraway, fennel, paprika, or saffron.

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Top 10 Best Foods For Six-Pack

Some foods are delicious and not healthy, but others are delicious and healthy.

1.Almonds

These delicious and versatile nuts contain filling protein and fiber, not to mention vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant. They’re also a good source of magnesium, a mineral your body must have in order to produce energy, build and maintain muscle tissue, and regulate blood sugar. “A stable blood-sugar level helps prevent cravings that can lead to overeating and weight gain,” says David Katz, MD, a professor at the Yale University School of Medicine. But what makes almonds most interesting is their ability to block calories. Research indicates that the composition of their cell walls may help reduce the absorption of all of their fat, making them an extra-lean nut.

Try for: An ounce a day (about 23 almonds), with approximately 160 calories. An empty Altoids tin will hold your daily dose perfectly.

2.Cucumbers

Thanks to the flavonoid antioxidant quercetin (which reduces swelling) and a high water content of 96%, cucumbers “can definitely help prevent bloating,” says Gans. This crunchy veggie is also extremely versatile: eat it in a chopped salad, sprinkle on top of yogurt, or munch on cucumber slices with homemade hummus. 

3.Burn fat with yogurt

Eating regular and Greek yogurt is a great way to banish belly flab. The probiotics in yogurt balance out the good bacteria in your gut, and this keeps things moving along your digestive tract.

One to three cups of low-fat or fat-free yogurt also counts toward your recommended calcium and protein servings for the day.

4. Green Tea


Consumed for thousands of years, green tea is an incredibly healthy drink that offers a number of benefits, including a leaner waistline. Green tea is packed with various polyphenols and antioxidants that combat inflammation, increase metabolism, and burn fat. Chief among these polyphenols is EGCG (Epigallocatechin gallate) which mobilizes stored fat to be burned for energy, by increasing noradrenaline in the body. EGCG inhibits an enzyme that breaks down norepinephrine, so by stopping the actions of that enzyme, EGCG preserves noradrenaline, leading to greater fat burning and weight loss.

5.Quinoa

Never heard of it? Pronounced KEEN-wah, this whole grain contains 5 grams of fiber and 11 grams of protein per half cup. Cook it as you would any other grain (although some brands require rinsing). Quinoa’s nutty flavor and crunchy-yet-chewy texture are like a cross between whole wheat couscous and short-grain brown rice.

Try for: At least one half-cup serving (a third of your whole-grain requirements) per day. Try substituting AltiPlano Gold brand instant quinoa hot cereal (160 to 210 calories per packet), in Chai Almond and Spiced Apple Raisin, for oatmeal. Look for it in health-food stores.

6.Lentils

As a member of the super-nutritious pulse family, lentils—along with other seeds that grow within pods like chickpeas, white beans, and dried peas—are packed with protein and fiber, which increase satiety. They’re also a good source of iron; this is important because studies have shown that being deficient in the mineral could slow down your metabolism.

“Add lentils to salads or use in place of whole grains like brown rice,” says Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, Health‘s contributing nutrition editor. “They also make a great ‘bed’ for a serving of lean protein, along with a generous portion of veggies.”

7. Avocado


Avocados aren’t just for making a tasty dip for fried tortilla chips. They’re also great in salads, on sandwiches, or even layered in an omelette. Avocados contain lots of fiber and heart-healthy monounsaturated fat, which keeps hunger at bay and supports gut health. Additionally, studies show that people who regularly eat the tasty fruit have smaller waistlines than those who don’t.

8.Make meals colorful with this Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

If you’ve made a resolution to eat more plant-based foods, here’s an easy way to get in a whole day of fruit — and a whole rainbow, too!

Bright and simple, honeyed Greek yogurt is topped with an array of fresh fruits. Feel free to use whatever toppings you have in the house, but keep in mind One Green Planet’s advice that “consuming different color foods plays a role in insuring you are getting enough essential nutrients, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, fiber, and more.”

Here’s how to make this delicious, nutritious fruit-topped yogurt bowl at home:

Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

Yield: 1 serving
Prep time: 10 minutes
Total time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

• 1/2 cup Greek yogurt, vanilla
• 1-2 Tablespoons honey
• 2-3 strawberries
• 1/4 cup raspberries
• 1/4 cup mango and/or fresh pineapple
• 1/2 green apple, sliced
• 1/4 cup blueberries and/or blackberries
• 1-2 Tablespoons sliced almonds
• 1 Tablespoon chia or hemp seeds (optional)
• 1/2 lime or lemon (optional)

Directions

1. Place yogurt in a bowl. Swirl in honey.

2. Top with berries, mango, and/or pineapple, apple, almonds, and seeds. Drizzle with lime or lemon juice, if desired.

3. Enjoy!

9.Veggie Soup

Researchers at Pennsylvania State University found that people who ate broth-based (or low-fat cream-based) soups two times a day were more successful in losing weight than those who ate the same amount of calories in snack food. Soup eaters also maintained, on average, a total weight loss of 16 pounds after one year. “Plus, it’s a simple way to get your vegetables,” says Susan Kleiner, PhD, RD, author of Power Eating(Human Kinetics, 2001).

Try for: At least one cup of low-calorie, low-sodium vegetable soup every day.

10.Fennel

This perennial herb offers some serious benefits for your belly. “For centuries, fennel has been used to improve digestion, relieve GI spasms, and reduce bloat,” says Stephanie Middleberg, RD, founder of Middleberg Nutrition in New York City.

You can eat fennel raw or cooked (try sprinkling it on pizza or making Tomato-Fennel Soup). And fennel seeds have slimming properties, too: In a previous interview, Ann Louise Gittleman, PhD, recommended sipping on fennel tea to de-puff your stomach before a big event. 

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Top 10 Deadliest Foods That Can Kill You

We all love to eat something new, but watch out for the foods in this list.

1.Cherry seeds

Tinker, tailor, soldier, spy…or die, if you bite into too many cherry stones. Or apricot, plum or peach pits. They contain hydrogen cyanide, which is so poisonous that a mere 0.1 grams has the potential to kill a 10 stone (150 pound) person. As a cherry pit contains around 0.17 grams of cyanide, ingesting just one or two crushed stones could kill you. The amount of cyanide per cherry stone varies, so a lethal dose could be higher than just one stone, but why take the risk?

2.Fugu (Pufferfish)

There’s a good reason why fugu (or pufferfish) is banned in the United States: it’s one of the most poisonous foods in the world. Unless it’s cooked exactly right, the puffer fish is 1,200 times more deadly than cyanide, which makes those cherry pits looks like a walk in the park.

3.Potatoes

Glycoalkaloids, also found in nightshade, can be found in the leaves, stems, and sprouts of potatoes. It can also build up in the potato if it’s left too long, especially in the light. Eating glycoalkaloids will lead to cramping, diarrhea, confused headaches, or even coma and death. It’s said that just 3 to 6 mg per kilogram of body weight could be fatal. Avoid potatoes with a greenish tinge.

4.Sannakji Choking Octopus

In Korea, rather than you choking on your food, your food might actually choke you. A Sannakji wriggling octopus can be a great treat for those who love seafood. You can pick them up in local markets in Korea, but you have to be extremely careful — these octopi are served while the animal is still moving. They have been known to attach their tentacles and suction cups around the necks of diners and choke them to death. Sometimes food gets its revenge.

5.Casu Marzu: Sardinian Maggot Cheese

Casu Marzu is a traditional Sardinian cheese that’s extra-fermented by live maggots that partially decompose the cheese. Not feeling this one? Neither is the US government. The cheese is banned for sanitary/hygienic reasons.

6.Raw Honey

Because it doesn’t go through the pasteurization process in which harmful toxins are killed, unpasteurized honey often contains grayanotoxin. That can lead to dizziness, weakness, excessive sweating, nausea, and vomiting that last for 24 hours. Typically just one tablespoon of concentrated grayanotoxin can cause the symptoms above. Consuming multiple tablespoons would be a bad idea.

7.Cashew nuts

Firstly, these are seeds, not nuts, so you’ve been misled all this time. Their shells are deadly, and have a coating of anacardic acid, which can burn your skin if handled incorrectly, as well as give you a nastily upset stomach. Additionally, cashews must be cooked or steamed before consumption, as in their raw state they contain urushiol, a chemical which is also found in poison ivy, and can be fatal if consumed in large enough amounts. So if you see cashews growing in the wild on your travels, don’t pick or eat them.

9.Hot Dogs

Not all of the foods on this list are strange and exotic. Everyone loves hot dogs. (Well, maybe strict vegetarians don’t, but you get the point.) As widespread as these little meat missiles are, they come with some risk. Hot dogs can cause asphyxiation, especially in young children, which can lead to death. You should always take small bites, and chew the heck out of your hot dogs. If you have little kids, cut those hot dogs up before serving them

10.Alfalfa Sprouts

Alfalfa sprouts, particularly raw, are an “ideal” environment for bacteria growth. Over the past two decades there have been 30 separate foodborne illness outbreaks associated with the consumption of sprouts, including Salmonella and E. coli, according to the US Department of Health & Human Services.

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Top 10 Essential Vitamins and Minerals Your Body Needs

We all need vitamins and minerals to function normally, but what are the most important that our body cant work normally without them.

1.Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps our bodies absorb calcium, which is important for bone health. Not getting enough of this vitamin can increase:

  • your likelihood of getting sick
  • your chances of bone and back pain
  • bone and hair loss

While you technically should be able to get your daily vitamin D by being in the sunlight for 15 minutes, the reality is that over 40 percent of people in the United States don’t. Living in wintery locations with little sunlight, working an office 9 to 5 life, and applying sunscreen (which blocks vitamin D synthesis) makes getting vitamin D hard. This vitamin is also hard to come by in food, which is why Taub-Dix says to look for this ingredient in your multi.

2.Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

The primary purpose for vitamin B1 in the body is to help your body make use of the carbohydrates you take in on a daily basis, utilizing the nutrient for energy.

Another main purpose for this nutrient is to promote a healthy nervous system where it will help maintain proper nerve transmission throughout the cells.

Where To Get It: One of the best sources of vitamin B1 in the diet comes from sunflower seeds, with a quarter cup supplying almost 50% of your daily needs. Other good sources include yellowfin tuna, black beans, and lentils.

3.VITAMIN A

GOOD FOR: Healthy eyes and general growth and development, including healthy teeth and skin.
NATURAL SOURCE: Carrots and other orange foods including sweet potato and cantaloupe melons – all of which get their hue from the carotene pigment.

4.Magnesium

Why you need it: Low levels may cause menstrual migraines and tension-type headaches, and up your diabetes risk.

How to get it: For starters, eat regular meals. In a recent study, adults who ate breakfast, lunch, dinner, and two snacks were more likely to meet the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for magnesium than those who didn’t. “Small amounts of magnesium are in many foods, so eating more meals increases your odds of getting enough,” says Pleuss. A top source: nuts. An ounce of most types offers up to 20 percent of the RDA (320 mg for women over age 30).

5. Calcium

Over 40 percent of the U.S. population doesn’t get enough calcium from their diet. This means those people aren’t getting the mineral they need for strong bones and teeth. Women in particular start losing bone density earlier, and getting enough calcium from the start is the best nutritional defense against this loss.

Foods with calcium

  • fortified cereals
  • milk, cheese, and yogurt
  • salty fish
  • broccoli and kale
  • nuts and nut butters
  • beans and lentils

6.Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Another variation of the B vitamins, riboflavin helps the body break down and process the three macronutrients (protein, carbs, and fats), as well as promoting a healthy skin complexion.

Where To Get It: One extremely good source of vitamin B2 is Calf’s liver, which supplies you over 100% of your daily needs, however since most people are not going to willingly eat this food, milk is the single most popular source of riboflavin. One glass of milk will provide almost 30% of your daily needs, so it’s a simple way to make sure you’re getting enough.

7. VITAMIN C

GOOD FOR: Strengthening blood vessels and giving skin its elasticity, anti-oxidant function and iron absorption.  
NATURAL SOURCE: Everyone knows this one – oranges! But they’re not the only source – other fruits and veggies packed with Vitamin C include guava, red and green peppers, kiwi, grapefruits, strawberries, Brussels sprouts and cantaloupe.

8.Iron

Why you need it: Not getting enough iron puts you at risk for anemia and may also lead to fatigue or hair loss.

How to get it: Fire up the grill! Three ounces of beef provides about 20 percent of the RDA (18 mg for women under 50). So does a serving of beans, tofu, or spinach, although the iron from plant foods isn’t absorbed as easily by your body. “Add a tomato salad or a few orange wedges to a vegetarian meal — the vitamin C will help your body better utilize the iron,” says Dee Sandquist, R.D., a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

9.Zinc

“Zinc tends to be low in older people and anyone under a lot of stress,” says Lerman. Which, (hello!) is basically everyone. And it makes sense. Zinc supports our immune system and helps our body use carbohydrates, protein, and fat for energy. It also aids in wound healing.

Foods with zinc

  • oysters
  • grass-fed beef
  • pumpkin seeds
  • spinach
  • organ meats
  • tahini
  • sardines
  • brown rice
  • wheat germ
  • tempeh

10.Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

The Top 10 Vitamins That Everyone Should Include In Their Diet!

Niacin is a third B vitamin and also plays a key role in energy production and maintaining the nervous system. In addition to this, is also promotes a healthy digestive system.

Where To Get It: Chicken breast meat is a really good source if niacin and provides 72% of your daily needs per 5 oz serving. Other foods that contain niacin include yellowfin tuna, halibut, and turkey breast.

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