Top 10 Best High-Calorie Healthy Foods

1.Cheese

402 Calories/100g; 455 Calories/Cup; 68 Calories/Tablespoon

Cheese is a calorie-rich milk product that is a staple for years all over the world in different forms. Cheddar, cream cheese, feta, mozzarella, ricotta, parmesan, and cottage cheese are all loaded with protein and calcium that will help you gain muscle mass and strengthen the bones

2. Salmon

Salmon is a good source of lean proteins, omega 3 fatty acids and other vital nutrients. However, it is very high in terms of calories as well. One fillet may contain as many as 400 calories. Therefore, you need to keep your portions in check. Or, you can avoid other foods while relishing the many benefits of this healthy fillet.

3.Peanut Butter

We have a love-hate relationship with peanut butter. We love the taste and its proven ability to help build muscle, burn fat, and even fight heart disease, but we hate that those benefits only apply when you enjoy the creamy spread in moderation. In other words, spooning it straight out of the jar (multiple times a day) is not a good idea. Why not? Consider this: two large spoonfuls can pack almost as many calories and fat as a Snickers bar! At around 100 calories per tablespoon (about the same as regular butter), your best bet is to enjoy peanut butter sparingly in recipes like these (and then put away the jar!).

4.Coconut milk

Coconut milk has the ability to boost your metabolism and induce weight loss. However, this only happens when you consume it in limited quantities. This drink is very high in terms of calories. One cup of coconut milk contains 552 calories. Therefore, you must be mindful of the variety you choose for yourself and consume it in limited quantities.

5.Banana

200 Calories/100g; 89 Calories/Cup; 25 Calories/1 oz

Bananas are loaded with dietary fiber, potassium, protein, vitamins A, C, and folate, and healthy fats (7). Consuming 1-2 bananas per day will keep your energy levels up, improve your stamina, and make your bones strong. You can have a banana, a cup of milk, and a few nuts for a power-packed breakfast or just make a smoothie with the same ingredients and consume it before working out.

6.Quinoa

While we love quinoa as a tasty and versatile protein source, many dieters mistakenly believe it’s a muchlower-calorie alternative to rice. In reality, one cup of cooked quinoa has 222 calories, putting it on par with brown rice (which has around 218 calories per cup). Enjoy it in your favorite healthy dish, just be sure to portion it out like you would rice or pasta (1/2 cup or about the size of your fist).

7.Raisins

Raisins are healthy, undoubtedly. And another thing that there’s no doubt about is the calorie content of raisins. One and half ounces of raisins contain 129 calories, yet, they’re that high in terms of calorie content.

raisins

One and half ounces of raisins contain 129 calories

8.Avocado

160 Calories/100g; 234 Calories/Cup; 156 Calories/ ½ avocado

This buttery and soothing green fruit is everyone’s favorite. If you want to gain weight – consume avocado. If you want to lose weight, consume avocado! Avocados are rich in healthy fats, vitamins K, E, A, C, and B6, magnesium, potassium, and sodium (9). Consuming one avocado per day can help strengthen your immunity, improve your energy levels, and make your skin glow, which comes with proper nutrition and good food habits.

9.Ground Beef

Depending on what kind you choose, plain, unprepared ground beef can contain 350 calories and 28 grams of fat (or more) per small 4-ounce serving. Aim to purchase 93-percent lean or higher to save on excess calories and fat without skimping on flavor in your favorite recipe.

10.Tahini

Tahini, also known as sesame butter gives you 89 calories in just one tablespoon. While it is a rich source of healthy fats, vitamin B and calcium, the calorie content of this food may make you want to check your portions. It is quite easy to fill up on this food due to its nutritional value but doing this can have a negative effect on your BMI. Two tablespoons of Tahini at a time should be sufficient.

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Sources:www.doctor.ndtv.com,www.stylecraze.com,www.shape.com

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Top 10 CELEBRITY DIETS THAT ACTUALLY WORK

1.Beyoncé

While Sasha Fierce has recently devoted herself, and her social media, to a vegan lifestyle, Beyoncé is also famous for completing the Master Cleanse, an all-liquid diet of cayenne lemon water, to prepare for her role in the 2006 film Dreamgirls. During that time, Beyoncé allowed herself a cheat day to indulge in pizza and wine. 

2. Kim Kardashian Atkins 


Wondering how Kim Kardashian shed her post-baby weight so quickly? Calling it the “greatest challenge” of her life, Kim lost around 25 kilos in 11 months leading up to her wedding. Featuring a diet that mainly consists of protein rich foods high in healthy fats like avocado and nuts, as well as eggs, fresh fruit and vegetables, and cheese, while eliminating the intake of carbs.

It is also advised for dieters to stop counting calories – instead ensuring you consume three regular sized meals and two snacks every day. 

Kardashian also enlisted the help of celebrity trainer Tracy Anderson to keep her exercise in check and reportedly had a chef accompany her on tour with Kanye West in order to keep her meals carb-free.

3. Jennifer Aniston, Demi Moore, Sandra Bullock – THE ZONE DIET

WHAT IT IS: Developed by former scientist Dr. Barry Sears, The Zone Diet involves getting 40 percent of your daily total caloric intake from carbohydrates, 30 percent from carbs and 30 percent from fats. According to Sears, balancing the correct amount of amino acids with carbs helps control the appetite to prevent over-eating (which leads to weight gain). Followers eat three portion-controlled meals and two snacks a day, preventing you from getting too hungry – or cranky. Hollywood hottie Jennifer Aniston was such a big fan, some have even called it the “Jennifer Aniston Diet.”

4.Marilyn Monroe

Eggnog for breakfast? Miss Marilyn Monroe herself would start her day with two raw eggs whipped in warm milk. Opting to skip lunch, the pop culture icon would then consume broiled liver, steak, or lamb and five carrots for dinner, finished with a decadent hot-fudge sundae dessert. 

5. Victoria BeckhamAlkaline Diet 


ex-Spice Girl, fashion designer and mother of four Victoria Beckham cites the alkaline diet as her method of maintaining her incredibly svelte figure. The diet tries to keep the body’s pH level between 7.35 and 7.45 by ultimately aiming the dieter to eat 80% alkaline (fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes – fennel, broccoli, grapefruit and kale are considered the most alkaline) and 20% acidic (wheat and dairy products, coffee, sugar, meat, fish and alcohol) foods. 

Reportedly Beckham’s daily diet includes grilled fish, smoked salmon, scrambled eggs, yellow fin tuna, sushi salad, and blueberry smoothies, which effectively controls aging due to their high omega 3 content. Those who keep an alkaline diet boast increased energy levels, improved memory, as well as the prevention of cancer and heart disease.

6. Sofia Vergara, Ricki Lake, Lauren Conrad, Jennifer Lopez, Julie Benz -FRESHOLOGY

WHAT IT IS:Freshology provides calorie-controlled, low-carb, high-protein, all-natural gourmet meals (prepared by a five-star chef, ooh la la) delivered straight to your front door. Said to be the “Diet Plan of Choice for the Dancing with the Stars Celebrities,” meal plans start at $48 a day.

“The food is good and I don’t have to think about it!” says sultry star Sofia Vergara. But the best part? You’ll even get dessert.

7.Kate Middleton – The Dukan Diet

Kate Middleton took a cue from the French and slimmed down for the Royal Wedding with The Dukan Diet. After an initial kick start of straight protein and vegetables, the regimen is broken into three phases that get less strict week by week, with variations depending on how many pounds you’re trying to shed.

8. Angelina JolieThe Ancient Grains Diet 


To keep her energy levels up, Angelina Jolie makes sure she regularly snacks on and adds ancient grains such as quinoa, chia seeds, millet, spelt and buckwheat to her diet. The humanitarian and film star claims provide her with nutrients she can’t find anywhere else, plus boasts glowing, radiant skin and shining, healthier hair to prove it.

9. Kim Cattrall, Nicole Kidman, Oprah, Eva Mendes, Bill Clinton – THE SOUTH BEACH DIET

WHAT IT IS: According to their website, The South Beach Diet is “a food-lover’s diet”. Divided into three phases (the first two are the most strict), the program is said to eliminate cravings, kick start weight loss and maintain for life. While there’s no counting calories or strict portion sizes, followers must say goodbye to bread, rice, potatoes, pasta, baked goods, and fruit – at least for the first two weeks. Relatively simple in principle, it replaces “bad carbs” and “bad fats” with “good carbs” and “good fats.”

10.Lady Gaga – Baby food diet

Did Lady Gaga purée her pounds away? The singer is rumored to have tried Tracy Anderson’s baby food diet, a plan that replaces your first two meals of the day with Gerber’s baby food, followed by a health-conscious dinner. While she has yet to fess up, other celebs have also been linked to the diet, including Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Aniston, and Gwyneth Paltrow

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Sources:www.shape.com,www.harpersbazaar.com.au,www.shape.com

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Top 10 Vegan Mistakes

1. Not eating enough variety.

When you first stop eating animal products, it’s easy to get stuck on what’s easy. We ate pizza four times in a week once, and pasta five times. Both are extremely easy to make with various sauces and toppings, and while carbs are good for you (your brain runs on them!) and pasta does contain some protein, you need other nutrients, too. Add in more vegetables—frozen are fine and have all the same nutrients as fresh!

2.Assuming That Vegan or Vegetarian Products Are Automatically Healthier

Unfortunately, just because a food product is labeled “vegetarian” or “vegan” doesn’t necessarily mean it’s healthier than the regular alternative.

For example, almond milk is a popular, plant-based milk that’s often a staple in vegan diets.However, while almond milk is low in calories and enriched with several important vitamins and minerals, it is not necessarily healthier than cow’s milk.

For example, 1 cup (240 ml) of low-fat cow’s milk contains 8 grams of protein, while the same amount of unsweetened almond milk contains only 1 gramSweetened almond milk can also be high in added sugar, with 16 grams of sugar in just 1 cup

3. Going Vegan Overnight


One of the quickest downfalls I’ve seen is to “go vegan” literally overnight. One day you’re chowing down on two cheeseburgers, and the next, you’re swearing off all animal products forever. A small subset of people, often motivated by serious medical diagnoses or some other emotional reason, can do it. They have a strong, unbreakable “why.” But for most people, it absolutely doesn’t work that way — and it is a shock to your body. Start eliminating one food category at a time. Poultry, dairy, fish, pork, beef, eggs, etc., and give your body time to adjust.

4.Being obsessed with protein.

You don’t need as much protein as you may think you need, and if you’re eating enough variety, you shouldn’t have a problem getting enough of it, or any nutrient for that matter. No Meat Athlete’s website states that the total number of calories from protein that you need is between 10 to 15 percent of your total calories.

5.Not Getting Enough Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 plays several important roles in the body. It’s important in the creation of red blood cells and DNA, among other processes.

Unfortunately, the main sources of vitamin B12 are animal products, such as meat, poultry, shellfish, eggs and milk products.For this reason, vegetarians have an increased risk of vitamin B12 deficiency

Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause fatigue, memory problems and numbness. It can also lead to megaloblastic anemia, a condition caused by having a lower-than-normal amount of red blood cells

Unfortunately, a high intake of folate can actually mask vitamin B12 deficiency, hiding symptoms until the damage becomes irreversible.However, there are foods and supplements available that can help vegetarians meet their vitamin B12 needs.

6.Not Eating Enough Iron


You need iron. It’s a mineral required for vital biological functions including transporting oxygen throughout your body. In fact, every living cell in your body needs iron to function, so it is a big deal to make sure you are getting enough! Iron comes in two forms, heme and non-heme. About 40 percent of the iron in animal products is heme, which your body easily absorbs. Non-heme from plants isn’t absorbed as easily, so you need to eat more of it. Vegan sources of iron include:

  • Coconuts
  • Legumes (beans and peas)
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Oats (traditional steel-cut)
  • Quinoa
  • Raisins
  • Sesame seeds
  • Sun-dried tomatoes
  • Swiss chard

7.Eating too many meat and cheese substitutes.

People say going vegan is too expensive for a reason—they’re thinking of all of the substitutes they’ll “have” to buy when they go vegan… but you don’t have to buy them! There are plenty of products out there from companies that make fantastic meat and cheese substitutes, but they aren’t necessarily healthy, and you can make plenty of substitutes at home for a fraction of the price. Looking to cut it out? Try making veggie burgers with beans, vegetables, and spices, baked in the oven to cut out oil, or make your own cashew cream sauce for pasta to make mac and “cheese”.

8.Eating Too Few Calories

Many foods and food groups are off-limits for vegans and vegetarians, which can make it challenging for them to meet their calorie needs.In fact, vegans and vegetarians tend to eat fewer calories than people who eat both meat and plants.

One study compared the nutritional quality of 1,475 people’s diets, including vegans, vegetarians, vegetarians who ate fish, people who ate both meat and plants and people who ate meat only once a week.Vegans had the lowest calorie intake across all the groups, consuming 600 fewer calories than people who ate both meat and plants.

Vegetarians had a slightly higher calorie intake than vegans, but still consumed 263 fewer calories than people who ate both meat and plants

9.Avoiding Fat


We live in a fat-phobic society, but our bodies can’t absorb certain vitamins unless fat is present. It’s also a source of energy. If we don’t eat fats, we don’t live. It doesn’t do you any good to drink a huge fat-free smoothie or skip a healthy dressing on a salad because there are vitamins that your body can’t absorb without the presence of some fat.

There are bad fats — ones that harm our health and provide no benefits. Those are trans fats and other hydrogenated fats that are highly processed, completely man-made, and unnatural. Skip those.

However, you want to make sure you’re getting enough Essential fatty acids (EFAs). Among other benefits, they help your body absorb the nutrients in your food and help maintain healthy cell walls. You need both (that’s why they’re called essential), but your body can’t make them, so you must eat them. They come in two forms: omega-3 and omega-6 and should be eaten in a 2:1 ratio of two parts omega-6 to one part omega-3.

10.Not having more than one reason to go vegan.

For some, one reason may be enough, but studies show that for most people, they need two or more reasons to go vegan, whether for health, ethical, or environmental reasons. Do your research, and find out what’s important to you. Animal agriculture is the number one cause of global warming; do you want to contribute to that, or fight against it? Have you read that eating a plant-based diet can help fight heart disease and high blood pressure or even prevent seemingly genetically predisposed diseases? Do you want to save the cows from their untimely death at two years old, when they should be living 20 or more years when not farmed? Find your reasoning, and do your research. 

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Sources:www.thoughtcatalog.com,www.healthline.com,www.beachbodyondemand.com

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Supplements Vs Real Food

This question is very important, bellow will give you some variants, hope will enjoy this.

1.Protein powders

Protein powder comes in lots of different forms and flavours to suit what you need, there are of course pros and cons of taking these though:

Pros

Protein powders are a really quick source of protein and provide a quick digesting hit that you can take anywhere with you.

A big positive I find in taking these is that depending on the supplement company you use – they can actually be cheaper than eating whole foods.

Another slightly strange positive for me is that they come in sweet flavours which I find helps me when I am eating clean because you don’t get to eat the food they are modelled on. Protein powders also require next to no preparation which saves a lot of time.

Cons

The biggest downside to supplements is that they aren’t real food. By this I mean you don’t get all of the nutrients and other vitamins that you get from actual food.

When you eat, for example, beef, you get around 25g of protein per 100g serving which is roughly similar to that of most protein powders.

However, you also get plenty of vitamin B12, Zinc and Iron along with Creatine, all things you don’t get from protein powders. As another benefit, food is filling! It fills your stomach for longer which means you will feel you have more energy and will be able to perform better.

Which is better?

In my opinion, I will choose food over supplements for my protein intake every time, but that doesn’t mean I don’t use them.

I think they are very useful as long as you use them sensibly and don’t neglect whole foods as the main bulk of your protein intake.

In simple terms, food is better but supplements are helpful!

2.Vitamin And Mineral Supplements

Vitamins and minerals supplements can give you the vitamins and minerals needed by your body to support a variety of functions.

Pros:

  • These supplements can help you maintain optimal health, especially if your food consumption is low.
  • They can improve a wide range of bodily functions and help maintain your mental health.
  • They decrease your risk of vitamin deficiency.
  • They help you digest much better.
  • They allow a person to get a regular daily intake of essential vitamins, which is especially important for children.

Cons:

  • Excessive vitamins and minerals can have an adverse effect on a person’s overall health.
  • Fat-soluble vitamins, for instance, can be contained in your tissue, especially if you take more of them than you need.
  • Excess vitamin A can cause congenital disabilities and liver problems.
  • Too many minerals, such as calcium, selenium, magnesium, iron, and zinc, are dangerous for the health as they can led to toxicity. Excess iron, for instance, can cause digestive complications, while excess calcium might increase your risk of forming kidney stones.

3.Creatine

Creatine is an amazing supplement – easy to take, relatively cheap, brings on some amazing improvements to your body and your overall performance, but is the 5g you should have a day better from food or powder?

Pros

Taking Creatine is super simple. Usually, to get your 5g it can either be one small scoop of powder.

Or to make it even simpler most pre-workout supplements have your daily intake of Creatine already put into them.

For me though the biggest advantage of taking Creatine as a supplement is because of how much food you need to eat to get your 5g, here’s a rundown:

  • Pork = 5g per Kilo
  • Red meat = 4.5g per Kilo
  • Herring = 6.5g per Kilo
  • Salmon = 4.5g per Kilo
  • Tuna = 4g per Kilo
  • Cod = 3g per Kilo

So as you can see you need to eat a LOT of food to get that Creatine intake from food alone.

Cons

As with everything on this list a supplement doesn’t carry the nutrients of real food, but in this situation, the amount of food you would need to eat may mean it isn’t realistic!

I think though the biggest con for people is some of the negative impacts it can have.

The biggest thing to remember with Creatine is it makes you hold more water, which in turns means you put on weight (I tend to put on about 1.5 kilos in the space of two weeks when I start Creatine).

Another thing it’s known for is making you feel and appear bloated (this isn’t for everyone, however) but this should clear once you stop taking it.

On that subject, when you stop taking it – it usually states on the supplement to cycle Creatine but I don’t believe it’s necessary – you tend to lose all of the water weight very quickly and it can make your muscles look flat.

Which is better?

As with everything here, food is always going to contain more nutrients and other benefits than just taking a small scoop of powder every morning, in this case.

However, I will hold my hands up and say I would prefer to take the powder instead of eating a kilo of Herring every day!

My advice, choose a supplement which allows you to take in 3g Creatine per serving instead of the full 5g, then your daily protein intake should allow you to get the additional 2g you need. Best of both worlds really.

4. Calorie Supplements

Calorie supplements, also called weight gainers, are notable for their benefits of giving a person the ability to increase his lean muscle mass and increase the strength of his muscles as well. These are the supplements commonly used by most bodybuilders to help them build their great physiques. Although these products are proven to be effective, they are not without side effects.

Pros:

  • These supplements can help a person gain muscle mass quickly. They contain a high amount of carbs and proteins that are essential to gaining weight. These supplements contain low amounts of fat so you can rest assured that your weight gain is muscle instead of fat.
  • They also contain amino acids that help you acquire lean muscle mass. Calorie supplements contain arginine, which helps the body produce more nitric oxide, which improves the flow of blood to growing muscles.
  • These supplements can also give a person energy and stamina to last him through all his training and workouts.

Cons:

  • One common side effect of using these supplements is insomnia. These supplements contain caffeine to give you energy.
  • Too much caffeine, however, can keep you up all night.
  • These supplements are also shown to cause damage to the kidneys, especially after long-term use.

5.Omega 3/fish oil tablets vs Food

Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids are not produced naturally by the body so you must get them in another form, supplements are by far the easiest way to get these into your daily diet.

There isn’t a set guideline on how much you should consume on a daily basis but as a general guideline, the average person needs around 500mg per day.

Pros

Despite the fact that this supplement is commonly known with keeping the elderly mobile it also is fantastic for athletic performance, as it is one of the healthy fats it has great fat burning qualities to keep you leaner.

Along with other benefits like healthier hair, skin, brain, heart and joints – basically, it’s pretty good stuff!

Most supplements contain between 500mg – 1000mg a day so you get your whole allowance in one instant hit.

Cons

It isn’t fish (or seeds, or nuts, or really any other fatty foods).

You can actually get around 500mg of omega 3 and 6 fatty acids per 100g of oily fish like mackerel, not only do you get the fatty acids but plenty of protein as well.

Other foods you get plenty of omegas from are:

  • Pork = 5g per Kilo
  • Red meat = 4.5g per Kilo
  • Herring = 6.5g per Kilo
  • Salmon = 4.5g per Kilo
  • Tuna = 4g per Kilo
  • Cod = 3g per Kilo

All of these foods will help to build up to your daily intake but you will get plenty of other nutrients with these as well.

Which is better?

If you are eating plenty of oily fish and other foods listed above I would imagine you are getting your daily intake of Omega 3 and 6 so don’t need the supplement, but if you’re like me and don’t eat these foods every day then the supplement is a good idea.

The biggest thing to remember is that diets rich in omega 3 fatty acids have been shown to help to reduce inflammation and lower blood pressure, all of which will keep you healthier for longer, and isn’t that the aim with it all?

To Sum Up

The biggest thing to remember with dietary supplements is that they are just that, there to supplement your daily diet.

If your diet sucks, no amount of supplements is going to give you the results you want. Focus on real food as much as you can, then use supplements to fill in the gaps.

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Sources:www.musclefood.com,www.organic4greenlivings.com

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The 10 Worst Foods You Can Eat

This is going to be very helpful. In the end make some conclusions.

1.Chips

One ounce of regular potato chips has 152 calories and 10 grams of fat (3 grams saturated).If you eat just three ounces a week, in one year you’ll have consumed 23,400 calories and added about seven pounds to your waistline. And that’s from just a couple handfuls – which barely constitutes a satisfying snack for most of us.

Healthier Substitutes for Chips: Rice cakes and popcorn cakes are no longer the tasteless Styrofoam-like disks they once were. Now they’re available in lots of flavors, so you can satisfy a salty craving without hitting the potato chips.

2.Most Pizzas

Pizza is one of the world’s most popular junk foods.This is not surprising, given that it tastes awesome and is incredibly convenient to eat.

The problem is that most commercially prepared pizzas are made with seriously unhealthy ingredients.The dough is made from highly refined wheat flour, and the meats on them are usually processed. Pizza is also extremely high in calories.

Alternatives: Some pizza places use healthier ingredients. Homemade pizzas can also be very healthy, as long as you choose wholesome ingredients.

3. Stick Margarine

If your buttery spread can stand on its own, it’s the fats that are making that happen — specifically, its saturated fats. Saturated fats are more solid than, for example, a monounsaturated fat such as olive oil, and these fats are bad for you because they expand your waistline, raise your bad cholesterol levels (while lowering levels of good cholesterol), raise your risk of heart disease and raise your risk of suffering a stroke.

Stick margarine used to contain trans fats, also known as partially hydrogenated oils, and some brands still do (always read the ingredient label); trans fats are considered one of the worst — if not the worst — fats for you to eat.

4.Microwave Popcorn

Quick, easy, and often very tasty, microwave popcorn’s one of the worst foods to eat for several reasons. First, the microwavable bag is lined with a substance that, when heated, releases perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and The American Cancer Society, PFOA stays in the environment and our bodies for a long time after exposure, and it has been shown to increase risk of certain cancers in lab animals as well as cause developmental irregularities. While the EPA has not officially classified PFOA as a carcinogen, it’s scientific advisory board suggested that PFOA is likely a human carcinogen after reviewing draft risk assessment data in 2005.

Second, the artificial butter flavoring in microwave popcorn may also contain 1 of 2 chemicals known to cause respiratory problems: diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione (PD). While the biggest popcorn manufacturers have banned diacetyl from their products after it was shown to have caused lung diseases in those who regularly inhaled it (factory workers and even a consumer), many replaced the dangerous additive with 2,3-pentanedione, which recently has been shown to cause respiratory toxicity in rats.

5.Doughnuts


White flour, vegetable shortening, white sugar – and it’s deep-fried to boot.One glazed Krispy Kreme doughnut packs 200 calories and 12 grams of fat, including heart-stopping saturated fat, trans fats and cholesterol.

An old-fashioned cake doughnut is even worse: 300 calories, 28 grams of carbohydrates and a whopping 19 grams of fat, including 5 grams of saturated fat and 4 grams of trans fats.

6.Gluten-Free Junk Foods

Gluten-free is all the rage these days.

About a third of people in the US are actively trying to avoid gluten, according to a 2013 survey.

The problem with many gluten-free diets, is that people replace the gluten-containing foods with processed junk foods that happen to be gluten-free.These gluten-free replacement products are often high in sugar, unhealthy oils and refined grains like corn starch or tapioca starch. These refined starches lead to rapid spikes in blood sugar, and are extremely low in essential nutrients.

Alternatives: Choose foods that are naturally gluten-free, like unprocessed plants and animal foods. Gluten-free junk food is still junk food.

7. Anything Deep Fried

Deep-fried foods are the weakness of many; even First Lady Michelle Obama has confessed her love for french fries. One of the problems with eating deep-fat fried foods is that cooking foods at such high temperature may cause them to form toxic chemical compounds — that we then eat. You see, too many french fries won’t only increase your waistline (which they will); your side order is also linked to health problems such as stroke and an increased risk of certain cancers including breast, esophageal, head and neck, lung, pancreatic and prostate. Men, for example, who eat fried foods — doughnuts, fried chicken, fried fish and/or french fries — once or more per week increase their risk for prostate cancer as much as 30 to 37 percent.

High-temperature cooking, and especially deep frying, also causes foods to develop AGEs (short for advanced glycation endproducts), and AGEs have been linked to chronic inflammation and disease-triggering oxidative stress.

8.Fat-Free Ice Cream

Low-fat ice cream may sound like healthier fare, but it can cause just as many pounds gained, maybe even more! This is because sugar – another one of my heart-health villains – often replaces the missing fat in low- and non-fat varieties of ice cream. Fat helps your body feel satiated, and – like a speed bump – helps to slow any insulin surges needed to metabolize sugar in your bloodstream. Your body also needs fat to absorb and utilize fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. My advice – if you’ve got to have ice cream, keep the fat and limit portion size to 1/2 cup.

9. Imitation Cheese in a Can

Some people love this stuff.

But they ignore their protesting hearts: Two tablespoons – about the amount you’d put on two crackers – packs 276 calories and 21 grams of fat, 13 grams of which are saturated.

Healthier Substitutes for Imitation Cheese: 
Go for the real thing. Soft cheeses like Brie have about 100 calories per ounce.Goat cheese is even better: One ounce has 76 calories and 5 grams of protein.

10. Canned Soup


Although quick and convenient, canned soup can contain monosodium glutamate (commonly known as MSG),  a “flavor enhancer” that is notorious for causing reactions such as headaches, nausea, heart palpitations, and more. MSG is an excitotoxin that can enter the brain and cause damage to neurons. Although it is widely associated with Chinese food, MSG is also frequently found in American fast and processed foods – be sure to carefully examine food labels for its elusive presence – MSG can go by many names; my colleague.

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Sources: http://www.everydayhealth.com, http://www.healthline.com, http://www.science.howstuffworks.com, http://www.heartmdinstitute.com

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Top 10 Food Allergy Myths

In modern society allergy is big part of our life, so what are top myth to stop believing in.

1.You’re “allergic” to any food that gives you problems.

This statement is false, since there are several problems that can arise after eating specific foods, the majority of which are unrelated to allergy. True allergies to foods are immunologic reactions involving the class of immunoglobulins (proteins that assist in the body’s immune response) known as immunoglobulin (Ig) E. Other kinds of reactions to foods that are not food allergies include food intolerances (such as lactose or milk intolerance ), food poisoning, and toxic reactions.

The prevalence of food allergy in the population is much lower than the prevalence of adverse reactions to foods. It is estimated that true food allergies occur in 2% to 5% of the population.

2.Food allergies can be mild.

Truth:  Yes, reactions can be mild, but even if someone has experienced mild reactions (such as a rash) in the past, they can still have an anaphylactic response to the next exposure.  Allergies are unpredictable.  Here are some possible reactions to exposure to peanuts:  rash, vomiting, diarrhea, drop in blood pressure, swelling, losing the ability to breath (which will cause death if not treated immediately).

3.Food allergy is the same as “intolerance” or “sensitivity.”

There are similarities, for sure. Allergy, intolerance, and sensitivity are a little bit like siblings. They all belong to the same “family” of bad reactions to food. But there are big differences.

An allergy happens when the immune system, your body’s defense against germs, has a reaction to a particular food. It can be mild, like an itchy feeling or hives. Sometimes you get severe symptoms — called anaphylaxis — like trouble breathing, a swollen tongue, or dizziness.
Food intolerance means your body is missing an enzyme you need to digest some type of food. If you’re lactose intolerant, for instance, you don’t have enough lactase, an enzyme that lets you digest dairy products. If you’re gluten intolerant, you can’t process gluten, which is found in some grains including wheat, barley, and rye.

4.You cannot have an allergic reaction on the first known oral exposure to a food allergen.

Mythbuster

Over one‐third of IgE‐mediated allergic reactions occur to a food with no known prior ingestion.

The why?

It is immunologically required to be exposed to antigen/allergen in order to switch B cells from IgM to IgE production and for affinity maturation of B cell responses. This initial exposure (and sensitisation in allergic individuals) to an allergen may occur through the gut via allergens in breast milk,12 the skin particularly in children with a breakdown in the normal skin barrier such as those infants with eczema,13 or more rarely via the respiratory tract without any apparent ingestion of the food in question.

5.All food allergies in children resolve as they get older.” 

As they grow older, some children may tolerate foods that previously caused allergic reactions. This is more likely to happen in the case of allergies to milk, eggs, and wheat, in which the severity of reactions (or symptoms) may decrease by late childhood.

It is not clear in all cases, however, if the improved symptoms are an indication that the allergy has disappeared. Peanut allergy is the least likely to go away. To determine if a food allergy has gone away after an appropriate strict elimination period (typically greater than a year) an oral challenge should be undertaken by an allergist skilled in conducting these challenges.

6. As long as you don’t introduce a food to a child at too young of an age, and no one in your family has food allergies, your child will not develop one.

Truth:  Nobody knows what causes food allergies.  Also, even if no one in your family has ever had a food allergy, your child could develop one (as in our case).  No one is safe from food allergies.  They can even develop as an adult to a food you’ve eaten your whole life.

7.Most food allergies are caused by additives such as artificial colors and flavorings.

“Absolutely a myth,” McMorris says. It’s true that some reactions to additives are similar to those caused by food allergies. Nitrates, for instance, can cause hives and itching. And red and yellow food coloring have been linked to anaphylaxis.

The actual allergy triggers are the proteins in the food, McMorris says. Food additive intolerance is rare. Less than 1% of adults have it.

8.Only children who have had a history of anaphylaxis need an adrenaline autoinjector.

Mythbuster

It is not necessary for a child to have previously experienced anaphylaxis in order to be assessed as being ‘at risk of anaphylaxis’.

The why?

Whether or not a child with an IgE‐mediated food allergy is at risk of anaphylaxis is a clinical judgment that must be considered for all individuals presenting with an IgE‐mediated food allergy. There is no current test (skin test and OFC or other) that can reliably determine this risk.

The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) guidelines state that an adrenaline autoinjector (AAI) prescription is recommended for individuals with a history of anaphylaxis and may also be recommended if there are other known risk factors for more severe or fatal reactions. This includes children with a history of a generalised allergic reaction and any one of the following: adolescent age group, nut allergy, comorbid conditions (e.g. asthma and arrhythmia) or limited access to emergency medical care.

9.Peanut allergy is the most common food allergy.”

 Peanut allergy is the food allergy most likely to result in anaphylactic reactions (severe, potentially fatal allergic reactions), but only about 0.6% of the population is affected by peanut allergy. The most common food allergies reported by adults are allergies to fruits and vegetables.

Any food you’re allergic to could cause a serious reaction, whether it’s peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish, or shellfish. Those eight foods make up 90% of food allergies in the U.S. All of them have the potential to be life-threatening, McMorris says.

10.Oral desensitisation is a cure for food allergy.

Mythbuster

Although small studies suggest that desensitisation with a daily dose of allergen can be achieved for a majority of children with egg, milk and peanut allergy, the majority of children remain allergic once the daily therapy is ceased with current oral immunotherapy regimes and both minor and serious side effects are common.

The why?

Recent studies have reported successful desensitisation with oral immunotherapy (OIT) to peanut, milk and egg. This therapy is generally based upon daily administration of gradually increases allergen doses allergen with up‐dosing and maintenances phases. These have shown a capacity to induce desensitisation in allergic individuals, albeit with both mild and severe allergic symptoms during therapy in a significant proportion of patients.

However, the proportion of children reported to maintain sustained tolerance once regular daily administration of the allergen is ceased is disappointing low at less than 25% with high rates of side effects.

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Sources: http://www.webmd.com, http://www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com, http://www.itchylittleworld.com, http://www.medicinenet.com

Top 10 Most Common Food Allergies

In the list you will find foods that you buy everyday.

1. Milk

Cow’s milk allergy is the most common food allergy among children, affecting about 2-3% of children, although many children will outgrow their allergy before school age.2,3 However, recent research indicates that children who have milk allergy may be less likely to outgrow their allergy than they were in previous decades

2.Eggs

An egg allergy is the second most common cause of food allergy in children

However, 68% of children who are allergic to eggs will outgrow their allergy by the time they’re 16.

Symptoms include:

  • Digestive distress, such as a stomach ache
  • Skin reactions, such as hives or a rash
  • Respiratory problems
  • Anaphylaxis (which is rare)

Interestingly, it’s possible to be allergic to egg whites, but not the yolks, and vice versa. This is because the proteins in egg whites and egg yolks differ slightly.

Yet most of the proteins that trigger an allergy are found in egg whites, so an egg white allergy is more common

Like other allergies, the treatment for an egg allergy is an egg-free diet (13).

However, you may not have to avoid all egg-related foods, as heating eggs can change the shape of the allergy-causing proteins. This can stop your body from seeing them as harmful, meaning they’re less likely to cause a reaction

3.Fish

Fish allergy can often cause severe reactions, including anaphylaxis. Adults are more likely to have an allergic reaction to fish and shellfish than children, which is probably because adults eat these foods more often.

People who are allergic to one type of fish, such as cod, often react to other types of fish, such as hake, haddock, mackerel, and whiting.

This is because the allergens in these fish are quite similar. Cooking doesn’t destroy fish allergens. In fact, some people with a fish allergy can be allergic to cooked but not raw fish.

4.Wheat

Wheat contains the protein gluten which people who suffer from the coeliac disease are allergic to. In many cases, a person suffering from the coeliac disease can tolerate rice but not other wheat-related grains such as oats, rye or barley. Currently, there is no cure for the coeliac disease and those who suffer from it are typically advised to refrain from eating foods that contain gluten.

If gluten is ingested, a person who is allergic to it can experience various symptoms, ranging from mild to life-threatening. They can include:

  • Inflammation in the abdomen and bowel, which is often painful
  • Diarrhoea, bloating and cramping
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Muscle pains
  • Skin irritations

5.Peanuts

Peanut allergy affects between 1-2% of children and 0.6% of the overall U.S. population.2 Peanut allergic individuals may experience mild to life-threatening reactions, which can be unpredictable.

To prevent an allergic reaction to peanuts, all foods that contain or may contain peanuts should be avoided. Peanuts must be listed on food labels under the ingredient list or in a “contains” statement. Lupin is not a peanut ingredient, but has been reported to cause cross-reactivity reactions for peanut allergic individuals. 

6.Tree Nuts

A tree nut allergy is an allergy to some of the nuts and seeds that come from trees.It’s a very common food allergy that’s thought to affect around 1% of the US population

Some examples of tree nuts include:

  • Brazil nuts
  • Almonds
  • Cashews
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Pistachios
  • Pine nuts
  • Walnuts

People with a tree nut allergy will also be allergic to food products made with these nuts, such as nut butters and oils.

7.Soybean

Soybean allergy is a common childhood allergy. Most people grow out of it by the age of two, but occasionally adults are allergic to soybean. The symptoms of soybean allergy are similar to milk allergy, and they include:

  • rashes
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • stomach cramps

Some people with soybean allergy might also react to milk. Very rarely, soybean can cause anaphylaxis.

Soybean is used as an ingredient in about two-thirds of all manufactured food products, including bakery goods, sweets, drinks, breakfast cereals, ice cream, margarine, pasta, processed meats, and seasoned foods.

8.Sesame Seeds

Sesame seeds are especially potent when it comes to food allergens and are most often a lifelong allergy. An allergy to sesame seeds is also particularly difficult to control as the food label does not always specifically say sesame seeds. Other names indicate the presence of sesame seeds; for example, sim sim, benne or gingelly seeds. Both the people suffering from sesame seed allergies and food handlers need to be aware of each different name that can indicate the presence of sesame seeds.

Sesame seeds are tiny and it doesn’t take many to cause and allergic reaction. Some of the symptoms can be:

  • Skin irritations and rashes
  • Abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea
  • Itchy mouth, throat or eyes
  • Swelling of the face, nose or mouth
  • Shortness of breath
  • Anaphylactic reactions – in severe cases

9.Crustacean Shellfish

Shellfish allergy may affect as many as 2.6% of women and 1.5% of men.2Crustacean shellfish includes shrimp, lobster and crab and are the foods within the shellfish category that cause the most…Read More

allergic reactions, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.7Mollusks, such as scallops, clams and mussels, are often tolerated by those with shellfish allergy, but allergic individuals should discuss the risks with their healthcare provider. As with all food allergies, careful avoidance should be maintained to avoid accidental ingestion of allergenic food. Avoiding seafood restaurants and foods with “seafood” in the name (ex. “seafood chowder”) is an important strategy for avoidance. 

Common foods that may contain crustacean shellfish (not an exhaustive list): 

✓ Shrimp, lobster and crab
✓ Prawns
✓ Crayfish or crawfish
✓ “Fish” or “seafood” broth Asian sauces or sauce mixes
✓ Sushi
✓ Artificial crab sticks (surimi)
✓ Seafood or artificial flavoring

10.Other common food allergies

People can be allergic to almost any food. As a result, there are many allergies that affect a lot of people but aren’t part of the big eight; these include:

  • Cereal allergy – the most common foods in this category are oats, wheat, maize (corn), rice, rye, and barley.
  • Coconut allergy – uncommon, though patients may experience anaphylaxis. Those with other nut allergies are more likely to be allergic to coconut.
  • Fruit and vegetable allergy – allergic reactions to fruits and vegetables are usually mild. Cooking vegetables often destroys the allergens.
  • Pine nut allergy – pine nuts can cause severe allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis. People who are allergic to pine nuts might also react to peanuts and nuts, such as almonds.
  • Meat allergy – people with a meat allergy might react to beef, mutton, pork, or chicken. Cooking destroys some of the allergens in meat, but some people will still react.
  • Quorn allergy – Quorn is a type of protein, which is made from a fungus. There have been some reports of intolerance to Quorn, but this is not surprising because allergens are usually proteins.
  • Rice allergy – people who are allergic to rice can react when they eat it or when they inhale its pollen.
  • Spice allergy – reactions to spices are usually mild, but severe reactions can happen occasionally. Some people react to mustard, coriander, caraway, fennel, paprika, or saffron.

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