Working Out While Sick: Good or Bad?

This is very important question, bellow will answer the best way that we could.

Some experts use the “above the neck” rule to determine whether working out while sick is safe. Exercise is most likely safe when symptoms are located from the neck up.

When It’s Safe to Exercise

1.Mild Cold

A mild cold is a viral infection of the nose and throat.

Though symptoms vary from person to person, most people who have a cold experience a stuffy nose, headache, sneezing and mild cough.

If you have a mild cold, there’s no need to skip the gym if you have the energy to work out.

Although, if you feel that you lack the energy to get through your normal routine, consider reducing the intensity of your workout or shortening its duration.

While it’s generally ok to exercise with a mild cold, keep in mind that you might spread germs to others and cause them to become ill.

Practicing proper hygiene is a great way to prevent spreading your cold to others. Wash your hands frequently and cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough.

2.If you have aches and pains . . . listen to your body.

Giamo usually tells clients to try a workout, and if they start feeling bad after 15-20 minutes, then call it quits. In any workout, you’ll experience some discomfort associated with muscles being activated, but notice things like being unable to catch your breath or wheezing, as these are additional signs to stop what you’re doing.

“If you’re feeling fatigued or excessively tired, it’s better not to work out when sick,” says Dr. Ali. “Save your energy to allow for your body to feel better and recover.”

“Decide if you’re up for exercising, or would feel more comfortable reserving your energy,” offers Dr. Marcus. “Often times after resting for a few days when sick, people will realize they missed working out and will come back more determined than before.”

3.Earache

An earache is a sharp, dull or burning pain that can be located in one or both ears.

Though ear pain in children is commonly caused by infection, earache in adults is more commonly caused by pain occurring in another area, such as the throat. This pain, which is known as “referred pain,” then transfers to the ear.

Ear pain can be caused by sinus infections, sore throat, tooth infection or changes in pressure.

Working out with an earache is considered safe, as long as your sense of balance is not affected and an infection has been ruled out.

Certain types of ear infections can throw you off balance and cause fevers and other symptoms that make working out unsafe. Make sure you don’t have one of these ear infections before beginning exercise.

However, most earaches can just be uncomfortable and cause a feeling of fullness or pressure in the head.

Though exercise is likely safe when you have an earache, try to avoid exercises that put pressure on the sinus region.

4.Stuffy Nose

Having a stuffy nose can be frustrating and uncomfortable.

If it’s associated with a fever or other symptoms like a productive cough or chest congestion, you should consider taking some time off from working out.

However, it’s ok to work out if you are only experiencing some nasal congestion.

In fact, getting some exercise may help open up your nasal passages, helping you breathe better.

Ultimately, listening to your body to determine if you feel well enough to exercise with a stuffy nose is the best bet.

Modifying your workout to accommodate your energy level is another option.

Going for a brisk walk or bike ride are great ways to stay active even when you aren’t feeling up to your usual routine.

Always practice proper hygiene at the gym, especially when you have a runny nose. Wipe down equipment after you’ve used it to avoid spreading germs.

When Exercise Is Not Recommended

1.If you have a fever or the flu . . . skip the workout.

“The best advice is to not work out if your symptoms occur below the neck. This means not working out with a fever since you don’t want to increase your body temperature even further,” explains Jasmine Marcus, PT DPT. She’s right, and the so-called “neck check” is based on a study about exercising while ill.

Cunningham also recommends skipping exercise if you’re running a fever. That said, don’t assume the lack of a fever gives you the green light to work out when sick. “ Depending on what’s wrong, running outside in the cold or doing something to aggravate your immune system or make it fight harder may only set you back,” she notes. “Always consult your doctor if you have questions but never beat yourself up for taking a rest day if you don’t feel well. Listening to your body is key.”

“If you have a fever and/or the chills, it is always a good idea to rest and not work out until fully recovered,” says Ehsan Ali, MD. When your body has the flu, it’ll take three to five days for symptoms (such as chills, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting) to taper off. Do not exercise until you’re feeling better and you’ve been fever free for at least 24 hours.

2.Productive or Frequent Cough

An occasional cough is a normal response to irritants or fluids in the body’s airways, and it helps keep the body healthy.

However, more frequent episodes of coughing can be a symptom of a respiratory infection like a cold, flu or even pneumonia.

While a cough associated with a tickle in the throat isn’t a reason to skip the gym, a more persistent cough can be a sign you need to rest.

Although a dry, sporadic cough may not impair your ability to perform certain exercises, a frequent, productive cough is reason to skip a workout.

A persistent cough can make it difficult to take a deep breath, particularly when your heart rate rises during exercise. This makes you more likely to become short of breath and fatigued.

A productive cough that brings up phlegm or sputum may be a sign of infection or another medical condition that requires rest and should be treated by a doctor.

3.Stomach Bug

Illnesses that affect the digestive system, such as the stomach flu, can cause serious symptoms that make working out off-limits.

Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, stomach cramping and decreased appetite are all common symptoms associated with stomach bugs.

Diarrhea and vomiting put you at risk of dehydration, which physical activity worsen.

Feeling weak is common when you have a stomach ailment, increasing the chance of injury during a workout.

What’s more, many stomach illnesses like the stomach flu are highly contagious and can be easily spread to others.

If you are feeling restless during a stomach illness, light stretching or yoga at home are the safest options.

SUMMARYIf you are experiencing symptoms like fever, vomiting, diarrhea or a productive cough, taking time off from the gym may be the best option for both your own recovery and the safety of others.

If you are looking for workout clothes check our fitness and yoga leggings page.
Sources:www.healthline.com,www.aaptiv.com

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